The NCLEX-RN Prep. Presentation by Dr. Pat Bradley

On Monday, January 18, 2016, I attended the NCLEX-RN Preparatory Presentation, hosted by RNAO (Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario), with Dr. Pat Bradley. The NCLEX-RN (National Council Licensure Examination – Registered Nurse) examination is a license examination that nursing students take after receiving their BScN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing), in order to gain their professional license as an RN and be able to practice professionally. Once a nursing student has received their BScN degree and passed the NCLEX-RN examination, then – AND ONLY THEN – can they officially call themselves… a registered nurse. This is the professional title that hundred and thousands of undergraduate nursing students, at universities across North America, spend four good years studying and longing for. Being one of these students myself (and with the prospect of having to take this scary, scary exam in the next year looming over my head), I attended this event with the hopes of gaining some helpful advice, tips, and clarification.

The event was held at POD463A/B with Dr. Pat Bradley delivering the presentation. It was a quite a content-heavy and informative 2 hours (from 4pm – 6pm), where Dr. Pat Bradley picked apart the NCLEX-RN exam for a group of scared and equally eager third and fourth year Ryerson nursing students. Dr. Pat Bradley was thorough, helpful, and quite clear. Having a background as an NCLEX-RN item writer, faculty member of York University’s nursing program, and much experience in delivering similar preparatory presentations for the NCLEX across North America, she was able to clarify any myths, direct students to reliable study sources, and go over exam structure and content with great accuracy and honesty.

With many fourth years in attendance, students were very attentive, engaged, and involved throughout the event. Nerves were at an all-time high for every student in the room and the pressure was on for every professor in attendance to prepare their students for this “Be All End All” exam. Luckily for us students, we were given some extremely valuable information that will hopefully stick with us until it comes to Dooms Day… or in our case, NCLEX-RN exam day. If you are an upper level nursing student and were unable to attend this presentation, I will tell you some of the most valuable tips that the presenter shared with the attendees of this event.

#1: STUDY THE NCSBN DETAILED TEST PLAN FOR 2016. YOU MUST KNOW THIS PDF DOCUMENT INSIDE AND OUT. This document (here’s the link: https://www.ncsbn.org/2016_RN_Test_Plan_Candidate.pdf, you’re welcome) is your Holy Grail for this exam – it contains every component, every detail, every aspect about the NCLEX-RN exam so it’s safe to say that this document is not something you just “browse.” The National Council of State Boards of Nursing (NCSBN) are the people responsible for creating this licensing exam, and other licensing exam for alike nurses. They are the “Masters of NCLEX,” if you will. So they’re pretty much the most reliable source you can go to for any NCLEX-related information. Trust anything and everything they say – and this document says it all. Know it.

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#2: Despite the valuable nursing theory and community health concepts we learn during nursing school… this entire exam is completely BIOMEDICAL. This means that all those theories we learned, all of those community nursing concepts we learned, have an extremely slim chance of making it into this exam… and percentage of this type of content popping up is around 1% or less. This is highly in contrast with the past Canadian RN licensing exam (Canadian Registered Nurse Examination [CRNE]), which focused heavily on such content. There is significantly a lot more biological and physiological concepts on the NCLEX-RN, so make sure that you’re studying the right content. Refer to the NCSBN test plan for more specific detail on the concepts that will be tested.

#3: Due to the fact that the NCLEX being an American-based exam, any lab values or medication measurements on the exam will be both AMERICAN & CANADIAN values. This means that as Canadian nurses writing an American licensing exam, we are entitled to know and memorize both the metric and imperial measurement systems. This seems unfair and quite frankly, very annoying, but if we study well enough, we’ll probably thank ourselves for it in the long run. Therefore, on the exam, if it mentions a weight that’s in KGs (metric), you must also be able to convert that weight into LBs (imperial).

To all fourth year nursing students at Ryerson who are taking the NCLEX-RN in the coming months, I wish you all the luck in the world! Study hard, study well, and stay focused and motivated. You’ve almost made it. All you need is that license. Have confidence in your abilities and yourself; you’re going to be great registered nurses!