Get Outside

A man and dog walking near Humber River

Having spent my childhood running through cornfields and reading in the shade of huge oak trees, I sometimes find it hard to live in Toronto. I had always assumed that my longing to feel dirt in my fingers and the grass between my toes was because of this childhood. While, it definitely plays a role, I am becoming more conscious of just how important nature is to everyone’s well being.

In 2009 a study done by the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health found that the closer you live to nature, the healthier you are likely to be. This was found to be true for people living in cities which had plenty of green spaces. (Luckily, we live in Toronto, a city with tons of green spaces.) So being outside makes you healthier, but why? There are several theories. One is Vitamin D intake. The more time we spend outside, the more Vitamin D we soak up, the stronger our immune system. Another theory is that being outside improves our sleep as the natural sunlight helps to set our internal clock. Rather than relying on fluorescent lights and alarm clocks, this internal clock set by nature, helps to normalize our hormones (which can have the added benefit of weight loss).

Even beyond our internal clock and Vitamin D, being out in nature has been proven to make us happy. A study from the British Journal of Sports Medicine has provided proof that being outside causes “happiness, or the presence of positive emotional mindsets, broadens an individual’s thought-action repertoire with positive benefits to physical and intellectual actives, and to social and psychological resources”.

Even the dirt we walk or roll on has a part to play. Scientists at the University of Bristol and University College London discovered a couple of years ago a connection between dirt and mental health. There is a microbe found in soil called Mycobacterium vaccae. This microbe stimulates the same neurons of your brain that produce serotonin. Serotonin is known to increase your level of general well being. So even if you don’t live close to a green space or you have allergies and this time of the year is difficult, chances are you can still get your hands dirty with an indoor plant.

While Toronto may not be one of the top ten park filled cities in the world, we do have a large number of parks to enjoy. From High Park, Edwards Gardens, Dufferin Grove, Allan Gardens, the Islands, Rogue Park, Guildwood, to Woodbine and Humber River, the city is full of places to get outside, enjoy nature and improve your health.

Here is a complete list of Toronto parks to enjoy.

Get Outside

a woman's barefeet in the grass

Having spent my childhood running through cornfields and reading in the shade of huge oak trees, I sometimes find it hard to live in Toronto. I had always assumed that my longing to feel dirt in my fingers and the grass between my toes was because of this childhood. While, it definitely plays a role, I am becoming more conscious of just how important nature is to everyone’s well being.

In 2009 a study done by the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health found that the closer you live to nature, the healthier you are likely to be. This was found to be true for people living in cities which had plenty of green spaces. (Luckily, we live in Toronto, a city with tons of green spaces.) (http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/wellness_articles.asp?id=1680)

So being outside makes you healthier, but why? There are several theories. One is Vitamin D intake. The more time we spend outside, the more Vitamin D we soak up, the stronger our immune system. Another theory is that being outside improves our sleep as the natural sunlight helps to set our internal clock. Rather than relying on fluorescent lights and alarm clocks, this internal clock set by nature, helps to normalize our hormones (which can have the added benefit of weight loss). (http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/wellness_articles.asp?id=1680&page=2)

Even beyond our internal clock and Vitamin D, being out in nature has been proven to make us happy. A study from the British Journal of Sports Medicine has provided proof that being outside causes “happiness, or the presence of positive emotional mindsets, broadens an individual’s thought-action repertoire with positive benefits to physical and intellectual actives, and to social and psychological resources” (http://www.theecologist.org/News/news_analysis/1920068/science_proves_what_we_all_know_nature_is_good_for_your_health.html).

The dirt we walk or roll on has a part to play. Scientists at the University of Bristol and University College London discovered a couple of years ago a connection between dirt and mental health. There is a microbe found in soil called Mycobacterium vaccae. This microbe stimulates the same neurons of your brain that produce serotonin. Serotonin is known to increase your level of general well being. So even if you don’t live close to a green space or you have allergies and this time of the year is difficult, chances are you can still get your hands dirty with an indoor plant.

While Toronto may not be one of the top ten park filled cities in the world, we do have a large number of parks to enjoy (http://www.frommers.com/slideshows/818821-the-world-s-10-best-cities-for-parks#slide837064). From High Park, Edwards Gardens, Dufferin Grove, Allan Gardens, the Islands, Rogue Park, Guildwood, to Woodbine and Humber River, the city is full of places to get outside, enjoy nature and improve your health.

To see a complete list of Toronto parks to enjoy click here. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Toronto_parks

 

Staying up late

In this society, staying up late has become the new normal. As always, it has advantages and disadvantages. This week, I will be writing from a student’s perspective. Why do university students stay up late? Why there are less people in an 8am class vs 10am?

time-management-clockThe question I will ask today is how late is actually late? Perhaps after 11pm, after midnight or even later than that? I think it all depends on the person. If someone takes a 4 hours nap during the day, there is a good chance that he/she won’t feel sleepy until midnight. Everyone has their own sleeping schedule. No one can really define a specific time as being late for bed because everyone is unique. However, the general rule is to sleep before midnight, if you have work/school early in the morning. I tend to follow this general rule because I do have early morning classes.

What are the advantages of staying up late? The first thing that comes to my mind is finishing homework and/or studying for midterms. So the main benefit of staying up late is to get things done in this case. Some people just can’t focus during the day. They feel too distracted to do anything. They feel well rested and more energetic to finish their uncompleted work because there is nothing left to bother them. Again, it comes down to personal preference. Some people think the late night atmosphere is better for them vs those who like to get their task done before evening, so they can relax and sleep early. From a personal experience, I prefer to get things done as early as I can. I am one of those people who can’t stay up after midnight. I think there is more pressure on you if you are working on an assignment and it’s due the next morning. You are in a rush to finish that assignment that you forget to edit/proofread it, which leads to a lower mark. This is one of my reasons to finish all my assignments before evening as it gives me extra time to proofread/fix errors.

Feeling tried is perhaps the most common symptom of staying up late. When people feel really tired, their bodies and minds cannot function normally. We all know that sleep is as important as food and water to the human body. Other symptoms include constant yawning, poor concentration and tendency to dose off. People’s reactions are slower and they tend to eat more to satisfy their hungry stomachs. This leads to gaining weight as they end up eating more than those who sleep early.

So how much sleep is enough? Adults need about eight hours of sleep but it can decrease as you age. If you feel more tired during the day, then you should aim to get more sleep. Studies show that late starts result in reduced day time sleepiness as students are well rested and more focused. Perhaps this is why there are less people in morning classes? What is your reason for sleeping late? Do you think it’s worth staying up late?

Five Ways to Boost Your Immune System

A circle with immune system written inside. There are six other circles with arrows pointing to immune system. Inside these circle are the words, bacteria, Parasites, pollution, toxins, fungi and viruses.

Winter is coming. Well, actually it’s here. And with winter comes winter colds. It’s is impossible to avoid people who insist on sharing their germs. Transit, school, work, the grocery store, they are everywhere. If you can’t avoid them, you can at least boost your immune system and use some natural remedies to keep the winter cold at bay.

  1. Wash your hands. Sounds easy. I know, I know you are all saying that you already do this. But do you really? When you get home, before you eat, before you pick up your laptop? Washing your hands before you eat might make you feel like you are five again, but it is one of the most effective ways of keeping colds at bay. If you don’t always have access to soap and water you can use hand sanitizers. I don’t like to use those chemical laden ones so I make my own. All you need is coconut oil, it’s full of natural anti-bacterial properties, tea tree oil and whatever essential oil you like. (Rosemary is really nice)
  2. Cut down on the alcohol and increase the greens. Alcohol acidifies the body. Alcohol also increases the amount of sugar in your system and that reduces the ability of the white blood cells in your body to fight off infections. Not to mention how poorly you sleep after a night of drinking. Increasing the amount of greens you consume will help to counteract the acidification from the alcohol. Greens are also chock full of vitamin C.
  3. Shake it up. Movement and exercise reduces stress and boosts your immune system. It also leads to a better night sleep. Try rebounding. Rebounding is jumping on a mini trampoline, not only is it super fun, but it also helps to shake up and detoxify your lymphatic system.
  4. Make love more often. Believe it or not, there are several studies showing that having healthy sexual relationships also boost the immune system. A study in 2004 showed that the close contact of sexual encounters reduces the risk of colds. Having sex 1-2 times a week increases anti-bodies which help to combat the common cold. One more reason to make love not war.
  5. Get your vitamin D. It’s up to you how you decide to do this. Go out for walks or get a suppliment either way it’s important to make sure you are getting enough. Our bodies fight off infections using T-Cells. Vitamin D has been found to activate T-Cells. So it is vital to make sure you are getting enough. It’s generally recommended to take suppliments during the winter months. If you are unsure what your Vitamin D levels are, ask your doctor for a blood test.

Reasons you need more sleep!

Getting the recommended seven or eight hours of sleep is important as it affects your health, mood and even weight. Studies show that when people are sleep deprived, their body places an increased load on their hearts. This leads to high blood pressure. Your heart starts to pump blood at a faster rate when you are awake as compared to when you are asleep, your body doesn’t require a high blood flow.

Without ample resting time, the heart muscle gets fatigued. Because your heart has to work harder, you can have an increase in blood pressure or possibly thickening of the heart muscle, which can lead to more serious problems.

Lack of sleep makes you eat more snacks. Not getting enough sleep affects the types and amount of foods one eats. Sleeping for a shorter time and spending more time in an environment where people tend to overeat can lead you to eating excessively. Getting enough sleep helps you maintain your weight. Think about it for a second. If you are really tired, you will have less energy to cook something healthy for yourself. People who are tired seem to crave high-fat and high-calorie foods. So getting enough sleep is essential in maintaining your weight.

Not only sleep helps in maintaining weight, it also results in better memory and concentration. This is really important if your courses require you to memorize a lot of stuff. Since we are already in exam week, it’s really important to get enough sleep as it can lead to memory problems. If one doesn’t get enough sleep, the brain can’t process and consolidate the memories from previous day. This leads to memories not being stored/lost.

Memory Problems : Sleep Deprivation

Sleep deprivation increases your risk for diabetes, high blood pressure and even weight gain. It also leads to memory problems.

Here is another thing I learned. Losing 10 hours or more of sleep puts you in “sleep debt” (difference between what you need and what you got). As stated, it leads to hypertension, anxiety, irregular heart beat and compromised immune system. Your brain also pays the price when your cognitive skills and memory skills start to shut down. So if you think that you can cover that lost sleep by going to bed early and waking up late? Apparently you can’t. You might feel well rested but your brain is not. This is mainly due to the fact that sleep debt carries interest. You will have to pay it back over time. For your brain to fully function, you will need to sleep an additional 10 hours a night for one week.

In conclusion, sleepless nights are not good for health as well as good grades. Best way to get enough sleep is going to bed early and waking up on time.

References:

Image: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dZZSLwK1Cnw/TdKsLldpo0I/AAAAAAAABI0/m3cithAQciE/s1600/losingmymind.png

http://www.fitbie.com/lose-weight/tips/5-reasons-you-need-more-sleep/tip/1

http://healthyliving.msn.com/health-wellness/video/truth-or-scare?videoid=b032f907-9043-863e-a42a-1fff6e554874

Five Ways to Manage Stress

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With deadlines looming, papers half written, classes to attend, friends and family to see, life can get stressful.  Here are five easy ways to manage your stress

1. Learn to say no

This sounds easier than it really is. While you may want to go out, join a club, volunteer, or take more classes, be sure that you can handle the work load. Also, don’t be worried about letting people know that you need to take a step back from a project. There is definitely a learning curve but it is essential when it comes to managing stres

2. Get some exercise

Exercise is the wonder cure all for stress. It increases the body’s production of endorphins. These are neurotransmitters which make us feel good. It also works as a form of mediation. Have you ever been swimming or working out and just zoned out? This doesn’t mean that you need to spend hundreds of dollars on a gym memberships, go for a walk, go to a community centre, do yoga in your living room. I know that if I am working on a paper or project and I am struggling the simple act of taking a walk can make all the difference.

3. Look to your diet

It seems so obvious, what you put in your body will affect how it functions. If you want to feel tired and sluggish, pump your body full of sugar and processed food. Want to feel energized eat a lots of dark leafs greens, brightly coloured fruits and vegetables and drink plenty of water.  Dark leafy greens and brightly coloured fruits and vegetables are high in vitamins and minerals which will keep your body energized. They are also full of fibre which will fill you up longer. Unlike sugary food which will boost your energy and then cause you to crash, the natural sugars in greens and fruit keep you going all day.

4.  Sleep! Sleep! Sleep!

Sleeping when you are already stressed can be hard. Turning your mind off is a skill worth learning. It helps to go to bed without technology. I know, I know you want to check Facebook on your phone before you turn off the lights. But your bedroom should be a place for sleep and it helps to remove any distractions. If you still can’t get to sleep try taking melatonin. Your body produces it naturally and production decreases as we age. It is available in tablets at any health food store. One word of warning though, it can make you feel very groggy so best not to take it if you need to get up early the next morning.

5. Meditate

If you are stressed out over something that you can change, then change it. However, I think a lot of people get stressed by things over which they have no control. As difficult as it can be, you need to learn to let it go. Try meditation. Meditation is the act of looking at your thoughts and letting them go. This is not something that you will master overnight but it is worth learning. There are free meditation classes all over the city. Once you learn the basics it is something which you can easily and cheaply do to manage your stress.

 

How to Beat the Dreaded Summer Cold

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It’s official.  You have the dreaded summer cold.  You are pretty sure how you got it too.  Heat, mixed with doses of freezing cold air conditioning, lack of sleep and heaped with stress.  All things that could be remedied if only you could think straight.

So what are you to do?  What are all those remedies that your grandmother told you?   Drink lots of water and get plenty of rest.  Water, check.  Rest, not so much.  How can you sleep if you have to get up every few hours because you are coughing or your bladder is full?  What about chicken noodle soup and tea?  It’s hard to even think about turning on the stove in 40 degree weather.

Not to worry as a fellow summer cold sufferer I bring advice and tissues.  If you don’t have the energy to head out and pick up supplies there are plenty of natural remedies in your kitchen.  For starters, get out all of your lemons.  If it’s too hot to make a lemon tea, then just drink lemon water.  The lemons are loaded with vitamin C and the acidity of the lemons actually stimulates your body’s natural detoxifying processes.  If you have honey, add that to the lemon water or just eat it on its on.  Honey has natural antibiotics.  A recent study found that people who were given two ounces (about four tablespoons) of honey a day reduced the length of their colds by up to two days (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/diets/article-1180641/A-sticky-remedy-Eating-honey-shortens-colds-days.html).

So you are downing honey and lemon water, but are still stuck with that painful sore throat?  Head back to your kitchen.  Here’s a natural cough remedy with a kick that really works.  In a small jar with a lid add…

  • 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tbsp of water
  • 1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp fresh grated ginger
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 grated clove of garlic (1/4 tsp of garlic powder)
  • 1 tbsp honey

Shake the mixture well.  Take 1-2 tablespoons as you need. You can add less cayenne pepper if you find it too spicy.  However, the cayenne pepper will help reduce the pain of your sore throat and contains antioxidants and vitamin C and A.  Native American cultures have been using cayenne pepper medicinally for thousands of years.

So now your throat is feeling better, but you still can’t sleep for the heat.  Here are some suggestions from my fellow air conditioner deprived friends which might help you beat the heat.  Try having a cold shower in your pjs before you go to bed. By the time you wake up you are dry and you stay cool most of the night.  Or put wet clothes or cloths into the freezer. Take them out and wear them to bed.

Hopefully, these suggestions help you beat the dreaded summer cold.  I know that I am feeling better.

 

When To Stop Eating Before Bed?

rsz_clock

Over the course of the past two semesters I really pushed myself staying up into the wee hours of the morning studying and completing assignments. In order to stay awake I would eat! I definitely do not recommend this. But the good part about this is what I was eating was always healthy, for example, apples, grapes, pistachios, chicken, peppers, and asparagus. The only problem was that the volume of food that I would be consuming over the course of the day was enormous. Sometimes, I would have two apples, a bag of frozen shrimp, and a portion of salmon all after midnight! Unfortunately, I developed the habit of eating right up until it was time to get to bed and now that I am off for the summer this has continued. I really do not like this because I feel sluggish in the morning and have some belly bloating. I know that a habit is a learned behaviour. Therefore, I have decided if I can learn it then I should be able to unlearn it right? But first, I want to understand why it is important to not eat right before bed and find out when is the best time to stop.

After investigating why you should not eat before bed, I have discovered that the digestive system is quite complex involving many organs, hormones, and enzymes. During the night, the digestive process slows down producing lower levels of hormones and enzymes needed to carry out regular functions. Surprisingly, I had a difficult time trying to find concrete scientific support to help me understand the negative effects of eating close to bedtime. I did find one fairly new study that examined the effect of eating before going to sleep and the risk of cardiovascular disease, one of the leading causes of death for Canadians.1 This study found that those who waited 60-70 minutes after dinner before going to bed were 66% less likely to have had a stroke compared to those who went to bed within an hour of dinner. These results do not prove that eating before bed causes a stroke, but there is an association that waiting an hour or more reduces the risk.

Another negative outcome I looked at was the effect on your bodyweight. I have heard from numerous people that it does lead to weight gain, and I have always thought this to be true. However, there is no conclusive scientific evidence to prove this. As a matter of fact, it is the number of calories that you consume over the entire day that contributes to weight gain if it exceeds your daily allowance, not when you eat the calories. On the other hand, eating too much food, fatty foods, spicy foods, or caffeine before bed have been shown to reduce the quality and length of your sleep.2 Large meals and especially ones high in fat like fast food and deep fried foods, take longer for your body to digest and break down. Also, eating spicy foods can lead to acid reflux or heartburn. When you sitting or standing, gravity helps to some degree to keep the food moving along the digestive tract. Yet, when you lay down and your food has not been completely digested, some of the stomach contents may go back up into your esophagus, leaving you in discomfort.

After learning about the consequences, I have concluded that it is probably best not to eat close to bedtime. But what is the latest time that you should eat before going to bed? According to Dietitian and health expert Leslie Beck, there is no set rule. She recommends that if you are hungry close to your bedtime to eat a small snack like a piece of fruit or drink a glass of soymilk 30-60 minutes beforehand. Whatever you eat, she suggests you choose a snack that is low in fat so that it can be digested fairly quickly and eaten on an empty stomach, not after you have eaten a large meal, which your body will still be digesting. To help with getting a sound sleep and reducing the morning bloat, she advises her clients to aim to complete their last meal of the day by 8pm. All that being said, Beck suggests not eating a large meal, which is typically considered most people’s dinner, 2-3 hours before bed, but a light healthy snack is fine as long you have given your last meal enough time to digest, usually 4-5 hours.

Overall, it will be challenging to unlearn my old habit. But armed with the knowledge I have researched and shared with you, some self-discipline, and positive thinking, I know I can unlearn my bad behavior of eating right before I go to sleep! I will start by first with one hour then gradually work my way to eating my last meal two hours before bed.

Sources:

1. European Society of Cardiology Congress 2011, Paris, Aug. 27-31, 2011.

2. Help Guide. Retrieved from: http://helpguide.org/life/sleep_tips.htm

Photo Source:

http://images.teamsugar.com/files/upl0/1/12981/05_2008/8.jpg

 

Winning.

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Appealing a grade is never pleasant and often viewed as an unproductive, tedious process. However, with accurate justification and timely submission, it is possible not only for you to overturn your grade, but have your professor’s teaching reevaluated by the school to ensure the mistake(s) made is not a reoccurring factor. Welcome to Winning Your Appeal 101.
! Most people will tell you that the first thing to do once you receive a failing grade (one that you believe to be inaccurate) is to contact the professor and schedule a meeting to review the debated grades. This is true, although, there are several other tasks to be done. After you have established contact with your instructor, I recommend obtaining a course grade appeal form, found by clicking here. Once obtained, complete the form and select one of the five grounds of appeal. Regardless of how the conversion with your instructor goes, it i wise in all cases to still submit an appeal. Once you receive a failing grade, it is wise to automatically submit an appeal, knowing that it is possible to withdraw an appeal should your instructor, in fact, overturn the failing result.
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There are five grounds of appeal under which a course grade can be filed under:
A) Medical
B) Compassionate
C) Course Management D) Prejudice
E) Procedural Error
Filing under medical grounds is wise only if a medical emergency or incident occurred in your life within the semester that affected your ability to perform and do well in the course under which you received a failing grade. Remember, documentation is needed not only from the medical practitioner but the Ryerson Medical Form as well. Click here to obtain a copy.
Filing under Compassionate grounds is another option. You can select this as your reason for appeal if unforeseen circumstances occurred in your life during your enrollment in the course and affected your performance. However, if these circumstances that occurred were not addressed by you to your professor or program director upon your discovery (whether now or before), this could affect the appeal decision.
Filing under Course Management grounds is possible only if the instructor has deviated away from the policies listed within the Course Outline, a mandatory document each instructor must provide, whether hardcopy or online, at the beginning of the course. If you feel that the instructor has not properly followed the guidelines, you may have a case. Note: It is extremely important that you keep all coursework you have completed as this will be cross referenced with the course outline to confirm your claim of a grade appeal.
Filing under Prejudice grounds is the most infrequent reason for appealing an grade, due to the significant amount of proof needed by a student in order to file under this reason. If you feel that you have been discriminated against, for race, gender or any specific reason, it is mandatory that you consult with your student union first. I also recommend talking to the Ryerson Ombudsmun person, located within the RSU Student Centre as well. Both sources will give you an accurate answer as to whether or not you have sufficient proof to file an appeal under these grounds.
Last, Procedural Error are unique grounds under which many an appeal has been filed under, has won. Students can select this option if there is evidence that the course instructor has not followed correct procedure in either grade evaluation, grade submission or grade calculation. Not keeping an up to date grade score sheet (including previous grade adjustments) counts. Handing back assignments three weeks after its submission with no time for reevaluation before finals is another example. As long as there is proof of this, appeals filed under these grounds are usually granted.

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It is important to remember that all course grade appeals must be filed within your school department first. Be conscience of deadlines. Truth or not, an appeal submitted after a deadline will not be considered. I still recommend following up with the professor and hear their thoughts on your case. Some are reasonable. Others are not. It is also a good idea to bring the matter to the attention of your program director as some may be able to advocate in your favour. Regardless, remember that you must, absolutely must, file that appeal. If you have taken as course as part of Ryerson’s Continuing Education and are appealing a CE grade, the appeal must be filed within the school as well.
School can be challenging at times, just know there are avenues of opportunity with every obstacle. Better to have and not need that need, and not have.
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Human Body Care 101

The human body always amazes me. How adaptive and resilient it is. It is constantly undergoing brutal assaults on a daily basis, which include germs, stress, pollution and sleep deprivation. Yet, despite all the abuse it keeps going on to perform the activities of every day living. One thing I do not understand is why some people put their self-care on the back burner. They eat poorly, avoid exercise, never get enough sleep and let stress overwhelm them, never bothering to decompress.

I know people who take better care of their car!!! You would not fill up your car with dirty oil now would you? Why put foods in your mouth that are filled with fat, sugar, artificial flavours and other chemical preservatives most people cannot even pronounce?

Also, how many of you out there are physically active each day? Think about if you left your car sitting in your driveway for months without using it, what would happen to it? The battery would slowly lose its charge, tires would dry up and crack and pipes would dry up too. Similarly, if the body does not get regular physical activity, including cardiovascular, muscular and flexibility training, the proper functioning of your heart and blood vessels begin to decline. Your muscles and bones become weak and deteriorate and your joints become stiff.

Most of you wash your car regularly or least try too! Ok mine is in desperate need of one. But if you do not do wash it the dirt and salt in the winter months will cause rust and damage to the finish. With your body, if you are not drinking enough water you become dehydrated. Your cells need water for normal processes. If you do not get enough you may suffer headaches and you may find yourself feeling exhausted and worn out.

Sleep, is also essential for your body to repair and recover!!!! I believe a lot of you out there are sleep deprived and that includes me! One of my personal goals is to try to establish a routine where I sleep at least 7-8 hour sleep each night. Now going back to the car analogy, would you keep a car running endlessly even it is not being driven? If that was the case, it would run out of fuel eventually and the engine would die out. You shut it off and let it rest to recover. Just like your body, it needs a break so it does not burn out.

Speaking of burning out, you need to take time out for relaxation and that does not mean watching TV or looking at your friends status updates on Facebook! I read that researchers found an association between TV watching and life expectancy. They concluded that on average for every hour of television you watch it reduces your life expectancy by 22 minutes!1 I know some of you find TV relaxing and you can tune out the rest of the world but more often than not it just makes you feel more lethargic and useless. Instead, read a book, listen to music, go for a walk or simply take 5 minutes, close your eyes and just breath deeply.

Remember you only have one body, whereas with cars, once it wears out beyond repair you can always trade it in for a new one. Too bad we cannot do that with our bodies. However, with the proper care we can prevent and even reverse the harm we have faced and will continue to each day. Love yourself, love your body and treat it like a Ferrari not some beat up rusted 1980 Ford Pinto.

Reference:

1. Br J Sports Med doi:10.1136/bjsm.2011.085662
”Television viewing time and reduced life expectancy: a life table analysis”
J. Lennert Veerman, et al.