PedNIG Paediatric Nursing Skills Workshop: March 2016

On Saturday, March 05, 2016, I had the privilege of attending the Paediatric Skills Workshop hosted by the Paediatric Nursing Interest Group (PedNIG) of RNAO. The event was held at McMaster Medical Centre in Hamilton, Ontario. A large group of nursing students from nursing schools across Ontario eagerly attended the event, hoping to learn something new about the field of paediatrics. The room was filled with excited and anxious nursing students, waiting to hear from respectable and established paediatric registered nurses, hoping to pick their brains and learn some skills of the trade.

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The day began with open remarks from PedNIG RNAO representatives and executives, outlining the agenda for the day. The line up of speakers and presenters proved to be very exciting for the students, with a wide variety of speakers – from professionals who have been in practice for 20+ years, to new graduates who are all to familiar with the feelings of the students in the room. It was interesting to see the wide rang of experiences come together and speak about Paediatric nursing through different yet similar lenses. Each speaker and presented provided different perspectives and illustrated different ways of approaching this practice through their individualized experiences.

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The morning progressed with starting by learning how to complete a head-to-toe assessment of the paediatric population. We analyzed the process of how to conduct various health assessments in children ages 0-18 years of age, and how to act on complications found during certain assessments. It was a comprehensive review of the anatomy and physiology of the paediatric population that touched on key concepts and skills in paediatric nursing.

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The next session that followed was an overview of medication administration and dosage calculation for the paediatric population. Through this session, nursing students learned about different forms of administrating certain medications with various paediatric patients. We learned about how to assess for any signs and symptoms, how to assess for any adverse effects/toxic effects, etc. We also learned how to calculate the appropriate dosage of medication for paediatric patients depending on their weight and their condition. Students were attentive, actively participating, and collaborative with their peers throughout the entire session.

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The morning concluded by learning about paediatric mental health. This was a very new topic introduced to the practice of paediatric nursing, as mental health – up until recently – was not a standard assessment practiced in medicine. With increasing demands of putting more of a focus on mental health within health care, the paediatric population has proven to be one of the most vulnerable populations for instability in mental health. Through this particular session, we learned why exactly that is and certain influencing factors that affect the mental health of children. We learned what kinds of plans of action and intervention that paediatric nurses can take, in order to ensure that our patient population has a cohesive mental health. We learned about the importance of providing family-centred care and patient-centred care, and how we – as nurses – can play an important role as a source of support for our patients and their families.

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Following the morning’s workshop sessions, a lunch break ensued and afterwards, the afternoon’s session began. The afternoon’s session covered important topics in the field of paediatric nursing such as “Hot Topics in Paediatrics,” covering key illnesses and complications amongst the paediatric population (i.e Asthma, Type I Diabetes, pain). Following the Hot Topics session, a panel of esteemed professionals in the field conducted a Questions and Answers session with the students. This proved to be the highlight of the entire event, as students eagerly asked questions about the field and how to pursue a career in paediatrics as nurse to experienced professionals. Students asked questions such as:

“How do I gain experience in paediatrics as a student?”

“What makes a resume outstanding?”

“How can we maximize our experience in our clinical placements?”

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The panel of esteemed professionals were all too welcoming and eager to answer any inquiries and concerns that the students had. They answered with a high level of efficiency and conviction. The students were very receptive to the replies and very eager to participate in the discussions that were facilitated through the Q&A panel. This last session proved to be the most exciting aspect of the entire event and was a good way to end the day.

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Needless to say, the entire event proved to be very useful and very interactive for both the student attendees and the event hosts. The workshop was able to enhance the professional development of nursing students eager to build a career in paediatrics in a very significant way. The response to the various sessions held throughout the day were quite positive and enabled PedNIG – RNAO to be hopeful for future sessions. The event overall proved to be a huge success and attendees – myself included – left learning something new and feeling one step closer to their goals of becoming paediatrics nurses.

October is Child Abuse Prevention Month

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Fittingly, as I am a Child and Youth Care student, my first post will be child related.

A lot of us are familiar with ribbon campaigns and what some ribbon colours symbolize for example, one of the more famous ones is the pink ribbon and breast cancer awareness. But have you ever come across the purple ribbon?

History of Child Abuse Prevention Month:

First things first, to eliminate confusion, Child Abuse Prevention Month is April in the United States. Ours here in the Great White North is October.

Anyway, continuing on, the purple ribbon symbolizes awareness for various things such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Epilepsy, Lupus or ADHD, among many others. In the month of October however, it symbolizes awareness for Child Abuse Prevention. This matter directly affects some of our FCS programs such as Early Childhood Studies, Child and Youth Care, and Social Work (depending on what direction you go, I guess) so I believe it is important that we take a moment to familiarize ourselves.

According to Durham Children’s Aid Society, the use of the purple ribbon to signify Child Abuse Prevention Month was first started by them 23 years ago and then was adopted by organizations across Canada.

Signs of Child Abuse or Neglect:

There are many different ways in which children show signs that they’ve been harmed or neglected.

Physical Harm

Physical harm is a little more obvious than other types of harm because the evidence is on the child. Other than physical or internal injuries, physical harm can also be when there is inadequate child supervision, protection or care.

Signs of physical harm includes various injuries, inconsistent explanations as to how the child received the injuries, flinching when touched unexpectedly, extreme aggression or withdrawal, or wariness of adults.

Emotional Harm

Emotional harm is one of the most difficult types of harm to identify and prove. It happens when a child is treated in such a negative way that their self-esteem is severely impacted. It also includes the lack of a nurturing environment and exposure to conflict, abuse, or violence.

Signs of emotional harm include severe depression, anxiety, withdrawal, aggression, attention seeking, bed-wetting, or self destructive or aggressive behaviour.

Sexual Harm

Sexual harm is not only the sexual exploitation of a child but it is also when the person having charge of the child is aware or should be aware of the possibility of sexual molestation or exploitation by another person and they are unable to protect them.

Signs of sexual harm include age-inappropriate play, unusual or excessive itching in the genital or anal area, injuries to said area, displaying explicit acts, sophisticated or unusual sexual knowledge, or seductive behaviour.

Neglect

The origin of neglect usually stems from lack of knowledge of appropriate care for children or the inability to provide for a child that has special medical, mental, emotional or developmental needs that require more care, service or treatment.

Signs of neglect include poor hygiene, unattended physical problems or medical needs, consistent lack of supervision or lunch, delinquent acts or alcohol or drug abuse, truancy, inappropriate clothing for weather or dirty clothing.

For more in-depth information on the different types of harm please visit: http://www.fcsgw.org/protecting-children/types-of-abuse/

What to do if you Suspect Abuse or Neglect:

Depending on what program you are in, you may already be familiar with the term “Duty to Report. For those of you who don’t know, in short Duty to Report means that we have an obligation to report suspected child abuse or neglect. To whom you report to first, may depend on the situation, for example, if I were working in the field I would most likely tell my supervisor first and with his or her support I will then make a call to Children’s Aid Society (CAS). Ultimately, you would need to contact the proper authorities.

There are these public misconceptions that Children’s Aid does nothing more than take away peoples’ children however that’s wrong. In 2013, 97% of CAS investigations ended with children staying with their families. Surprising right? There is a new focus on in-home, early intervention services, which is based on the recognition that caring family settings are positive for children and early intervention can reduce the need for more intrusive services later.

If you suspect that a child is being harmed or neglected please make the call to CAS. Here is a website to help you determine which CAS location is the most appropriate for your case.

So you’re not quite sold are you? Still hesitant to make the call? Are you thinking that you only have a hunch or that you don’t have sufficient evidence and you don’t want to be the boy who called wolf? Well here are some tweets from the Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Society that may help ease you:

 

How to Help:
There are many ways to help support this cause, here are a few:

  • Spread Awareness. Yes, it’s a heavy subject but we need to talk about it more. Post about it on social media, share posts on FaceBook, retweet on Twitter, do what us Millennials or Gen Z are known to do and if that fails then word of mouth is always a good back up plan. After all it is how information got around before technology!
  • Wear Purple. October 16, 2015 is this year’s Dress Wear Purple Day in which people are urged to incorporate purple into their outfits in order to help increase awareness.
  • Donate or Volunteer. You can check out organizations such as BOOST, which is a Child and Youth Advocacy centre based here in Toronto dedicated to eliminating child abuse and violence. You can donate, participate in their fundraisers, or volunteer with them.
    • For more information you can visit their website: https://boostforkids.org/
  • Bake or eat baked goods. Woah, how can I help a cause and eat yummy treats you wonder? On campus, the Child and Youth Care Course Union will be holding a bake sale on Monday, October 19 on the 6th floor of the SHE building from 11AM until 2PM. If you’re interested in volunteering, baking, or donating some goodies for the cause then you can contact me at RU.CYC.Union@gmail.com. All the proceeds from the bake sale will go towards the abovementioned organization BOOST.

 

 

Here are some more links if you want to learn more about Child Abuse Prevention: