What it Feels Like for Global Youth

Recently the World University Service of Canada (WUSC) Ryerson and Ryerson University International Support hosted a panel discussion on global youth employment. The discussion centred on the difficulties that students and youth from the Global South have when migrating to the Global North. The panel consisted of Dr. Henry Parada, Associate Professor, School of Social Work, Ryerson University,
Ana Leticia Ibarra, Research Coordinator, Children and Youth Human Rights Empowerment Project, Christian Bambe, WUSC Scholar, and Thuch James, Founder, ROSS DAILYINC Online Magazine. Dr. Winnie Ng, CAW-Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy, Ryerson University gave the key note speech in which she discussed the intersectionality of love and power and the systemic racism and colonialism that bars newcomers from the same opportunities as other Canadians, both of which were further developed by the panel.

The panel began by speaking to the difference between the Global North and South and the challenges newcomers face. In the first place access to education is different in other parts of the world. In Canada we all receive and have access to basic education, there are places that don’t allow for that or have the system in place to. It is difficult to become educated in the Global South and therefore difficult to become employed. However, even if you do get an education it may still be difficult to get a job if you migrate to the Global North. This is because education is not transferable in Canada, if you are trained to be a doctor in South Africa you cannot work as a doctor in Canada until you have gone through our education system. These migrant workers are told their education is invalid here and are forced to start over from scratch. Not only is this harmful emotionally but it also sets migrants back and if they do not have a support system in place in Canada it makes it difficult for them to ever realize their professional and personal goals. Additionally, without an economic support system migrants may not be able to get the needed Canadian work or volunteer experience that employers require, let alone pay for their education twice. This is detrimental to migrants and to Canadians as they both lose out on valuable opportunities, Canadians lose the experience and opinions that come from people who learn and live in other countries. However, it is possible to overcome these barriers, past generations of immigrants made lives for themselves here in Canada and new generations will as well, it will be difficult because the system makes it difficult but there is hope.

The difficulties with credential recognition not only have economic impacts on individual but also psychological. Denouncing someone’s credentials sets them behind in their life progression and they may also internalize this, they may begin to feel that they are inadequate or that something is wrong with them when it is the system holding them back not themselves. Individuals may give up due to the distress and the knowledge that so much time will be wasted out of their life and this benefits no one. Additionally, there is a strange anomaly here. In Canada we accept the education of people coming from the United States, Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom but nowhere else. Why is this? The panel believed it was due to systemic racism. Which seems to make sense because why those four countries and no one else?

The panel then moved on to how employers can aid youth. Simply put employers can help by giving youth the opportunities to develop the practical skills needed. Currently there seems to be a shift towards an individualistic system where potential applicants have to develop practical skills on their own before even applying for a job. Employers no longer want to provide this kind of skill training, youth need to seek it out on their own. Adding on to that if migrant present these but not in a Canadian context they don’t count, they must develop them within Canada. This seems counterintuitive since Canadians who go abroad and learn new skills are welcomed back with job prospects because of this worldly experience but it doesn’t seem to go the other way.

Lastly, the ideas of the “brain drain” and associated “brain waste” that occur in Canada were reflected upon. These were two new concepts to me and two ideas that I found quite saddening. The Global North countries are attractive to youth and workers in other countries and they know this. Global North countries bring in the best students from the Global South and educate them and force them to stay here for a set period of time. This is the “brain drain”. We are taking the educated youth away from their communities where they could be making a large impact and benefiting the lives of the people around them. They could be setting up a system within their own countries to make them better but we keep them here. Along with this, the bright and educated migrants who come to Canada of their own volition are not allowed to work, this is the “brain waste”. We have skilled people coming into our country but they are only allowed to work in the service industry because their experiences are invalid. In all the panel agreed that Canada should look into the idea of return migration. Bringing bright youth to Canada and giving them the opportunity to get an education and then allowing them to return to their country or stay here and develop support systems for future generations to become educated and improve the lives of all.